October 2019

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CARTA joins the world to mark World Mental Health Day on October 10. The day aims to shed light on mental health issues on both a broad-scale as well as the community and individual level.This year’s World Mental Health Day is focused on raising awareness around suicide prevention, recognizing that every 40 seconds someone loses their life to suicide.Suicide was the second leading cause of death among young people aged 15-29 years, after road injury. Among teenagers aged 15-19 years, suicide was the second leading cause of death among girls (after maternal conditions) and the third leading cause of death in boys (after road injury and interpersonal violence), shows the World Health Organisation.WHO Director-General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says: “Every death is a tragedy for family, friends, and colleagues. Yet suicides are preventable. We call on all countries to incorporate proven suicide

Enrolment and completion of doctoral training in the continent are fraught with gender inequalities which contribute negatively to Africa’s contribution to global knowledge production and research. In general, Africans—who constitute 1.1 percent of the world’s scientific researchers—have authored just about 1.4 percent of all globally published research. Women in Sub-Saharan Africa constitute only 30 percent of the continent’s researchers.The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) is cognisant of women’s gender roles that likely affect their enrolment in, and completion of, doctoral programs. The article published in October, Gender responsive multidisciplinary doctoral training program: the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) experience, describes CARTA’s approach in challenging gender inequities in enrolment and completion of doctoral studies across the continent.Commenting on the publication, Anne Khisa, the lead author of the paper and alumni of the program, attests to the

Applications are open for the following three opportunities:CARTA Senior Faculty Visiting FellowshipsCARTA Postdoctoral FellowshipsCARTA Re-entry grantsPlease note the above opportunities are ONLY open to staff from a CARTA African partner institution, African partners research institutions, Board of Management or a CARTA graduate.Deadline for the three calls: September 15, 2019Submit applications to carta_fellowships@aphrc.org 

Costing research accurately is as much about winning today's grants as it is about long-term, sustainable think tanks. The ESSENCE on Health Research, an initiative that allows donors/funders to identify synergies, establish coherence and increase the value of resources and action for health research, is conducting a survey on research costing.ESSENCE on Health Research has led several innovative approaches to achieve harmonization and optimization of research funding, including the development of a good practice document series. One such output, the Five Keys to improving Research Costing in LMICs (‘the Five Keys’), has become a valuable resource for funders and research institutions since it was published in 2012. The Five Keys describes the research costing practices, particularly related to indirect costs, of funders and research institutions using case studies. The Five Keys document has also created a platform for funders and institutions to

[caption id="attachment_7353" align="alignleft" width="300"] Anne Khisa[/caption]Anne Khisa our Cohort Three Fellow in partnership with the Centre for Capacity Research at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, have developed new guidance on improving research capacity strengthening (RCS) evaluation practice.The project seeks to address the gap of very little evidence to help funders and program implementers to design ways of measuring RCS impact, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.The paper titled, A Framework and Indicators to Improve Research Capacity Strengthening Evaluation Practice, was published on June 14, 2019. The other authors are Evelyn Gitau, Director Research Capacity Strengthening at APHRC, Justin Pulford and Imelda Bates both of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine Centre for Capacity Research.Anne, who is a doctoral graduate from the University of Nairobi, was part of the seven-month project that also identified indicators to better direct current and future research capacity strengthening

Are you considering publishing your scientific work? We would like to share with you a great website—Think. Check. Submit—that highlights what to look out for if you want to avoid predatory publishers. The site helps researchers, like yourself, to identify trusted journals for your research.The site has a range of tools and practical resources to educate researchers, promote integrity, and build trust in credible research and publications.In addition, sometimes it might be difficult to find open access journals. Here are two search engines to find such publications: unpaywall and gettheresearch.

The University of Rwanda (UR) co-hosted the third CARTA vice chancellors meeting that brought together heads of CARTA partner universities, research institutions on April 26.Also invited to the one-day meeting were vice chancellors of 13 African universities in Southern, Eastern and West Africa who were in Kigali for the annual African Research Universities Alliance (ARUA) meeting. ARUA is a network of universities that pursue a common goal of enhancing research and graduate training in member universities.The meeting offered a forum for the participating heads of institutions to pledge their commitment to advance research and graduate training in Africa.

[caption id="attachment_7219" align="alignleft" width="344"] Dr. Elwyn Chomba, Ministry Community Development Mother and Child Health of Zambia, leads the discussion by the country team 02 at "African Leadership for Child Survival" held at African Union in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Friday, 18 January 2013. Photo by Jiro Ose/Unicef[/caption]The African Academy for Sciences (The AAS) and the African Institute for Policy Development (AFIDEP) launched a two-year programme to promote the systematic use of evidence in policymaking in Africa.The Evidence Leaders in Africa (ELA) programme will enhance the evidence-gathering and analysis skills of researchers from across the Continent and empower them to take a leading role in ensuring that the innovations and evidence they produce are relevant to and used in decision making.“Beyond this, we want scientists to become engaged with the policy making processes within African governments and help to champion a culture where