CARTA Fellows

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Deadline: April 15, 2018.The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) is a south-south partnership with a south-north collaboration jointly led by the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) and the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits). The Consortium was established with a mandate to build a vibrant African academy able to lead world-class multi-disciplinary research that impacts on population health in Africa.Building on its goal to secure the future and foster the career growth of its high-achieving graduates, the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) will o­ffer re-entry grants in 2018 to its fellows who have completed their PhD studies CARTA re-entry grants aim to support fellows returning to or remaining at their own institutions to start a research project.Re-entry grants will be awarded on a competitive basis taking into consideration the scientific quality of the

Two CARTA graduates Francis Fagbamigbe Adeniyi (Cohort 2) and Charles Drago Kato (Cohort 3) are among 25 early career scientists named in the prestigious African Academy of Sciences (AAS) Affiliates Program.The program recognizes exceptional young African scientists who are below 40 years, and is currently in its third cohort. AAS, a pan African organisation headquartered in Kenya, described this round of selection as being “the most competitive pool yet with an overwhelming number of nominations from across the five regions of the continent.” AAS aims to drive sustainable development in Africa through science technology and innovation.The 25 scientists will be supported to attend conferences, symposia and workshops and other activities that will improve their skills in proposal development, grant writing and pitching innovations, improve their publication records and ensure that their research impacts their communities from 2018 to 2022.“We welcome the new

Two publications by CARTA fellow Felix Khuluza (cohort 5) have been used to provide evidence for the most authoritative global research on substandard and falsified medicines by the World Health Organisation (WHO).A study on the public health and socioeconomic impact of substandard and falsified medical products reviewed all scientific papers on substandard and falsified medicines worldwide for the ten year period 2007-2016. 100 papers were included in the data analysis including the papers by the fellow from the University Of Malawi, Department Of Pharmacy. The publications by the CARTA fellow are:Khuluza, F (2014) “In-vitro evaluation of the quality of Paracetamol and Co-trimoxazole tablets used in Malawi based on pharmacopeial standards,” Malawi Medical Journal, 26(2):38:41.Khuluza F, Kigera S, Jaehnke RWO, Heide L (2016) “Use of thin-layer chromatography to detect counterfeit sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine tablets with the wrong active ingredient in Malawi,” Malaria Journal, 15:215.The

CARTA Cohort 2 fellow Linda Nyondo Mipando has been elected Deputy Dean at the School of Public Health and Family Medicine in the College of Medicine, University of Malawi. She is a registered nurse-midwife by training and is currently a lecturer in the Department of Health Systems and Policy at the college.CARTA Program Manager, Peter Ngure, congratulated Dr. Mipando for the feat. Another fellow, Lester Kapanda, cohort 5 fellow from the University of Malawi, congratulated Dr. Mipando on her new role and described her as “a mentor, a dedicated and hardworking lecturer.”Kapanda added: “Dr. Mipando is the first female to attain this high position at our college and once again congratulations and keep up the good work!!”Dr. Mipando’s research interests include, Health Systems and Implementation Science Research with a focus on service delivery. She is also keen on understanding HIV and

Year of Publication: 2017Abstract:Middle ear infections are common in children, and delay in diagnosis and treatment may result in complications such as delays in speech and language development and deafness. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and care seeking behaviour for middle ear infections in children under five years in Kigali city. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 810 children aged 6–59 months in Gasabo district of Kigali city, Rwanda. The prevalence of middle ear infections was 5.8%, of whom 4% had chronic suppurative otitis media. A child was less likely to develop middle ear infections if they lived in an urban setting (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.285–0.958) but more likely to develop middle ear infections if exposed to household smoke (OR = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.18–5.46). Parents were unlikely to know that their child

Folusho Balogun, CARTA Cohort 5 fellow, from the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria won the UNESCO-MARS Best African Women Researcher 2017 award for her work on cervical cancer and HPV vaccine for adolescents in Nigeria.She was one of five others to win the global Merck Foundation award for the best woman researcher of the year at the just concluded 3rd edition of the annual UNESCO-Merck Africa Research Summit (MARS) that was held in Port Louis, Mauritius from 28 and 29 November, 2017.The other winners were from Mauritius, Cameroon, and Rwanda. Additionally, three winners from South Africa, Senegal, and Botswana were presented with the ‘Best Young African Researchers Award’ during the convening.Folusho said: “There were over 500 submissions. The abstract I submitted is from my PhD work. I am so excited and grateful to CARTA for all the support

CARTA cohort 6 fellow Beatrice Maina will this week participate in a webinar where she will discuss the recent findings on how gender expectations shape early adolescence in Kenya, Malawi, and Nigeria. The one-hour webinar will be on November 16 from 1600 Nairobi time/ 0800 New York time.The free webinar is based on a series of articles from the Journal of Adolescent Health that unpack findings of the Global Early Adolescent Study (GEAS) carried out in 15 countries.It Begins at Ten: How Gender Expectations Shape Early Adolescence Around the World is the most comprehensive analysis to date—and the first to draw equally from high-, low- and middle-income countries—of how children on the cusp of adolescence perceive growing up as a boy or girl.Ms Maina is a research officer in the Population Dynamics and Sexual and Reproductive Health unit, APHRC. She holds a Master of Arts degree

[caption id="attachment_6213" align="alignright" width="225"] CARTA cohort 2 fellow Austin Mtethiwa of the University of Malawi with Prof. Akinyinka Omigbodun, CARTA Focal person at the University of Ibadan during the Network of African Science Academies (NASAC) meeting and the 40th Anniversary of the Nigerian Academy of Science in Abuja, Nigeria on 13 November 2017. PHOTO/ COURTESY.[/caption]Austin Mtethiwa, CARTA cohort 2 fellow from the University of Malawi, was in Abuja, Nigeria to attend the Network of African Science Academies (NASAC) meeting and the 40th Anniversary of the Nigerian Academy of Science. Prof. Akinyinka Omigbodun, CARTA Focal person at the University of Ibadan, was also at the the 13th Annual Meeting of African Science Academies (AMASA-13).The International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA) facilitated Mtethiwa’s attendance to the meeting.The conference discussed education and manpower development issues affecting Science Technology Innovation (STI) development in