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Enrolment and completion of doctoral training in the continent are fraught with gender inequalities which contribute negatively to Africa’s contribution to global knowledge production and research. In general, Africans—who constitute 1.1 percent of the world’s scientific researchers—have authored just about 1.4 percent of all globally published research. Women in Sub-Saharan Africa constitute only 30 percent of the continent’s researchers.The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) is cognisant of women’s gender roles that likely affect their enrolment in, and completion of, doctoral programs. The article published in October, Gender responsive multidisciplinary doctoral training program: the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) experience, describes CARTA’s approach in challenging gender inequities in enrolment and completion of doctoral studies across the continent.Commenting on the publication, Anne Khisa, the lead author of the paper and alumni of the program, attests to the

Costing research accurately is as much about winning today's grants as it is about long-term, sustainable think tanks. The ESSENCE on Health Research, an initiative that allows donors/funders to identify synergies, establish coherence and increase the value of resources and action for health research, is conducting a survey on research costing.ESSENCE on Health Research has led several innovative approaches to achieve harmonization and optimization of research funding, including the development of a good practice document series. One such output, the Five Keys to improving Research Costing in LMICs (‘the Five Keys’), has become a valuable resource for funders and research institutions since it was published in 2012. The Five Keys describes the research costing practices, particularly related to indirect costs, of funders and research institutions using case studies. The Five Keys document has also created a platform for funders and institutions to

[caption id="attachment_7353" align="alignleft" width="300"] Anne Khisa[/caption]Anne Khisa our Cohort Three Fellow in partnership with the Centre for Capacity Research at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, have developed new guidance on improving research capacity strengthening (RCS) evaluation practice.The project seeks to address the gap of very little evidence to help funders and program implementers to design ways of measuring RCS impact, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.The paper titled, A Framework and Indicators to Improve Research Capacity Strengthening Evaluation Practice, was published on June 14, 2019. The other authors are Evelyn Gitau, Director Research Capacity Strengthening at APHRC, Justin Pulford and Imelda Bates both of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine Centre for Capacity Research.Anne, who is a doctoral graduate from the University of Nairobi, was part of the seven-month project that also identified indicators to better direct current and future research capacity strengthening

Are you considering publishing your scientific work? We would like to share with you a great website—Think. Check. Submit—that highlights what to look out for if you want to avoid predatory publishers. The site helps researchers, like yourself, to identify trusted journals for your research.The site has a range of tools and practical resources to educate researchers, promote integrity, and build trust in credible research and publications.In addition, sometimes it might be difficult to find open access journals. Here are two search engines to find such publications: unpaywall and gettheresearch.

The International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP) is seeking early career researchers in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to produce policy-relevant evidence on family planning and fertility in cities and towns and their links to urban welfare.To qualify for the second round of fellowships, you must have obtained your PhD within the past ten years, you are interested in studying the links between urban development, reproductive health and fertility. This project aims to link the fields of family planning, fertility and population change with the field of urban development, to create a cadre of fellows with expertise in those areas, and to produce high-quality evidence relevant to policy issues in urban development.Interested applicants should submit a 2-page concept on their proposed research project by April 15, 2019. (The online portal is expected to open around March 15). These

Deadline: November 30, 2018.   The School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, under the direction of Dr Jude Igumbor, is seeking two postdoctoral fellows to head scientific writing of several completed and ongoing health system research projects with a focus on women, adolescents, children, and HIV/TB. The fellows will work closely with the Principal Investigator to produce manuscripts and grant applications and will have the opportunity to assume the first-author position on manuscripts. An advanced research or clinical degree is required for this position. Individuals may have a PhD in Public Health, Population Studies, Demography or related fields. Applicants must have a demonstrated track record of being primary author on peer-reviewed scientific publications and must have excellent scientific writing skills and data analysis abilities using Stata. Experience in HIV, TB, women, children and adolescents health research is required. This is a full-time position

CARTA in partnership with the Africa Center of Excellence in Public Health and Herbal Medicine (ACEPHEM) of the University of Malawi brought together 65 participants from Malawi, Kenya and Zambia for the Institutional-based Supervision Workshop in Malawi.The five-day hands-on and interactive training from July 23-27, 2018 provided a platform to discuss the status of research and doctoral training in Africa. It was also an opportunity to identify and critique different models of PhD supervision, exploration of the roles of supervisors, supervisees and the institution in the different phases of the PhD journey.This workshop was led by five facilitators—Peter Ngure (CARTA), Florah Karimi (CARTA), David Kariuki (University of Nairobi, Bernard Thole (University of Malawi), Lydia Njenga (University of Nairobi), Adamson Muula (University of Malawi), and Ademola Ajuwon (University of Ibadan).This is the second such workshop on capacity building for postgraduate supervisors.